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Still Hot, So Chill

Meauxbar’s Genepy 75

SARA ESSEX BRADLEY PHOTOGRAPHS

In September in the northern United States, they’re looking at clouds in the sky and lower temperatures in the evenings. For them, just a few weeks ago it was warm but now extra blankets are brought out for the bed and dogs are brought inside to be near the hearth.

Here in the sea level, semi-tropical land of steamy dreams, air conditioners are still operating at full pace and the short-sleeved shirt season goes on and on. September offers no relief from higher temperatures, only a reminder that at some point in the near future, we will feel cooler, less humid breezes – but not now.

We see national stores advertising flannel and clothes with weight; we don’t enthusiastically respond. Since football is a cool-weather sport, we constructed a great building with air conditioning to accommodate.

In the interest of continuing our seasonal quest for cool refreshing adult beverages, Meauxbar, the charming French Quarter neighborhood restaurant and bar recently re-opened on Rampart Street, has taken a local favorite, the French 75 cocktail, and instead of gin or cognac as the base spirit ingredient “introduces” a French Alpine herbal liqueur, Genepy des Alpes, first created in the early part of the 19th century. You don’t get much cooler than the French Alps.


Genepy 75

1 ounce Genepy des Alpes
3/4 ounce lemon juice
1/3 ounce rich simple syrup
Cremant du Jura


Shake first three ingredients. Strain into champagne flute and top with Cremant du Jura. Garnish with lemon twist.

Thanks to Meauxbar (942 N. Rampart St.) and to Natalie Secco, for creating and preparing the Genepy 75.

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